How Do Drugs Affect the Brain?

How Do Drugs Affect the Brain?

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How Does The Brain Work?

The brain is made up of billions of neurons, which are arranged into circuits and networks. Every neuron functions as a switch to manage the information flow. A neuron will fire and transmit its own signal to the other neurons in the circuit if it gets enough signals from the other neurons to which it is linked. This is why the brain is frequently compared to an extremely sophisticated and intricate computer.

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Ambien Addiction Guide 

Ambien belongs to the Sedative-Hypnotics drug subclass. Ambien works by activating the neurotransmitter GABA (CNS) to slow down the brain and central nervous system. Although used to treat insomnia, Ambien is only meant to be taken temporarily. Long term use can cause Ambien addiction. 

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Adderall Addiction Guide 

The class of medications known as amphetamines includes the central nervous system stimulant Adderall (the commercial name for dextroamphetamine-amphetamine). With a doctor’s prescription, it is lawful in the US and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1996. Read on to learn more about adderall addiction and how we can help you.

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What is a Wet Brain?

A brain condition known as wet brain, also known as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), is linked to both the acute and chronic stages of thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Thiamine depletion is a typical side effect of chronic heavy drinking and is evident in those with inadequate nutrition. Early detection is key to reversing the symptoms, but if wet brain is not treated, it can result in permanent disorientation, poor motor coordination, and even hallucinations. 

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Chronic Relapsing: How to Stop the Cycle

It is a significant step in someone’s life to enter a recovery program. The journey toward sobriety begins with hope, excitement, and motivation. However, many people do not realize it will also take perseverance to reach their goal. Successful recovery often requires persevering through many ups and downs, including the cycle of success and relapse. Read on to learn more about chronic relapsing.

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What to Say When Someone Relapses

Recovery is a challenging time for everyone, including friends and family of a person pursuing sobriety. One of the challenges is the likelihood of relapsing after a time of successful recovery. This is a disappointing and emotional time when words have the potential to help or hinder the recovery process. Yet, many times, a few words aptly spoken can propel a person forward to continue the journey. Read on to find out what to say when someone relapses.

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Can You Force Someone into Rehab?

It is common for loved ones and family members to eventually ask whether their loved one who is an addict can be forced into rehab. Unfortunately, this question looms more prominent today than ever due to a couple of troubling statistics. First, the percentage of people receiving help for substance abuse is slightly above ten percent. Secondly, fatal overdoses continue rising—almost tripling between 1999 and 2014. So it is not surprising that families and substance abuse experts are exploring various options. One is an involuntary commitment to treatment centers to help stem the tide of untreated drug and alcohol abuse. Find the answer to “can you force someone into rehab” below. 

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Is There a Difference Between a Drunk and an Alcoholic?

Some words are more culturally acceptable than others, even if the lines between the words are blurred. For example, describing someone who gets drunk while having a good time is often laughed at the next day. However, that same drunken person might be severely offended and become defensive if you asked him if he was an alcoholic. To better understand the complexity of alcohol use, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) describes the four drinking levels listed below which can help you see the difference between a drunk and an alcoholic.

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Why do Addicts Relapse When Things are Good?

Recovery from addiction is a challenging journey marked with ups and downs. Sobriety is to be celebrated and commended; those who reach this goal have the well-earned respect of friends and family. Science tells us, however, that addiction is a chronic disease—one to be managed and not cured. Like other chronic diseases, addiction relapse rate is cause for concern, so why do addicts relapse when things are good?

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Dry Drunk vs. Sober

Sobriety is a process that requires commitment, demanding work, the right attitude, and the help of others. Although the initial goal is simple, stop drinking, those in recovery face many challenges throughout their lives. One issue that arises is dry drunk syndrome vs being sober. 

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